Brockville by Gas Light … 1854

The text of two articles from the Brockville Recorder

26 January 1854  &  2 February 1854

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Brockville by Gas Light

26 January 1854:

Part one:

How speedily, in the new world, the solitude of the first gives way to the hum of many voices and the busy haunts of men. The spot where, a few years ago, the forest trees waved their leafy branches, has assumed a different aspect. The hardy pioneer penetrates the deep recesses of the woody wilderness, or fixes his abode on the margin of some solemn flowing river. A few years pass away, and other men seek his companionship and settle down beside him. Before the sturdy arms of these pioneers, the forest trees disappear and give place to smiling fields. Other settlers follow, and then again the fields give way to villages. Villages rise to towns, and towns grow to cities, and these important changes are but little noted, because in this, our noble country, they are of almost yearly occurrence.

Men are still living who remember when there was but one house in Brockville. There was little stir then; there is much stir now,   Brockville may not have grown so rapidly as some few other towns in the province, but it has increased greatly, and is becoming more important every year. The solitary one house of old has many companions now. In no town of its size are there so many elegant and substantial buildings to be found as in Brockville. Its stores, in extent, and in the quantity and quality of goods displayed, stand unrivalled. Its merchants are active, progressive men; its mechanics intelligent, and but for the spirit of Toryism (fast dying away), arising from “early associations,” we would almost feel inclined to set our beautifully located town down as the “model town” of Upper Canada.

But we are digressing. Our intention was to take a glimpse of Brockville by gaslight, and despite the snow storm raging around, (Friday and Saturday evenings), we will do so. Let us therefore begin at the Gas House, respecting which we note the following particulars:

The house was built at an expense of something over  1000. It was commenced about the 7th of October [1854] and on the 12th January inst., the gas was lighted for the first time   an evidence of energy with which the Directors carried forward the work. Mr. [William] Holmes was the contractor, but the brick work of the building was done, by Thomas Price;   James Perry, of Montreal, being the superintending spirit of the work. The gas-house is allowed to be a very fine one, being in size 46 by 100 feet. The works, we understand, are capable of supplying gas to a population of 30,000, with additional retorts to those already in operation. It was intended to have the streets lighted, but the directors were unable to procure posts. The lighting of the streets will be carried into effect as soon as possible. When the gas-works went into operation, upwards of 200 had contracted to use the gas. This number has been greatly increased since.

Leaving the gas house, the first glare of “the new light” is obtained from the residence of our esteemed townsman, Dr. [Robert] Edmondson. Passing on, it is next met with at friend W. [William] Gilmour‘s, but as we do not wish to obtrude on the privacy of families, we hurry onward through the drifting snow, till forced to seek shelter with our active and obliging friends, Hillyard and Griffin, who, under the auspices of the “Red Flag,” appear to be doing what the Yankees would call a “smart” business in dry goods and groceries. The stock being well shown off by the gas lights, crowned with chaste-looking white smoke bells edged with green, the appearance of which at a distance seem like inverted “lilies of the Nile”.

Onward a little farther and we step in to friend [Warren] Botsford‘s. Here the gas light forces, with good effect, the stock of hardware, heavy and light, full before the scrutinizing eye. Feeling satisfied of Botsford’s judgment in enlarging his store, and of the great improvement of gas light in displaying stock to advantage, we bid Botsford good night, and jump through the snow right into a bank of warm furs conveniently placed within the well-filled, gas lighted premises of our old friend [Andrew] Donaldson. From this comfortable retreat, we look around, and, imagination busy at work, conjure up the probable fate which might await us, were we surrounded by the living, original owners of Donaldson’s great fur establishment.
At length, remembering that there is no rest for us, we leave our comfortable quarters and enter leisurely the mammoth establishment of J. & S.[John and Samuel] Ross. To form a correct idea of the extent of this store it should be visited. Even with gas light, the length of the store is such, that a good telescope would be required to recognize an acquaintance at the extreme end of the dry goods range. When thoroughly completed, it will match any store in Canada. The various goods are divided into “departments,” each department being presided over by active, intelligent young men. In the chinaware department we observed three elegant dinner sets, two of them white, edged with gold, the third a rich Chinese pattern. In electro plate, we also saw several splendid specimens. We trust the Messrs. Ross will have no cause to regret the outlay ire rendering their store such as would do credit to any city in “the union”.

Crossing the street in an oblique direction from the premises just noticed, we were almost inclined to give friend [Alonzo B.] Dana, a call, but remembering that although he had lately been called out as one of the “town lights,” he had been disappointed in getting his gas fixings fixed, we passed to the drug store of Mr. Allan Turner, chemist and druggist, where alleviates may be obtained: “For all the ills that flesh is heir to” besides “oils and colours,” medical instruments, and a host of other articles as friend [Fordyce] Lothrop would say, “too numerous to mention,” and all to be had “by the light of gas”.

Leaving Mr. Turner’s and again crossing the street, we saw that Mr. [William] Johnston had taken advantage of gas light, which gave his store quite a life-like and lively appearance.

Mr. W. [William] Buell comes next in turn, and what with the light of knowledge in the shape of books of all descriptions to be had at his store, and the light of gas, if darkness prevails, either mentally or physically, the fault will not lie at his door.

Next comes Mr. R. [Robert] Fitzsimmons. Light in the grocery business is of the utmost importance, and Mr. Fitzsimmons has provided his store with an ample supply in order that his customers may see that full justice is done them, both in quantity and quality of their purchases, and which, be the quantity large or small, is always made up with a kind word and a pleasing smile.

Winks and Hutcheson [George Winks & George Hutcheson] stand next on the list. Before entering their “bower,” let us take a look at the windows. These silk velvets, laces, flowers, etc., must have been arranged by some Blythe assistant, no novice at his business. The tout ensemble does the young gentlemen credit. But enter the store and the same neatness of arrangement is observable. Mr. Hutcheson, we know, is method itself, but unless aided by able assistants, the store would sometimes appear “out of order”, but this never happens, and we think the excellent stock of goods, silks, etc., are seen at no disadvantage by gas light.

Here we are at the extensive wholesale and retail establishment of Morton, McKee & Co. [George Morton & Andrew McKee]. These gentlemen have lately enlarged their premises to a considerable extent, and yet every inch is occupied by a large and well-assorted stock of goods dry goods, hardware, crockeryware, groceries, and we do not know how many other wares. When all the contemplated alterations are completed, this will be one of the stores, in which, at night, the gas light will have a fine effect. This establishment is also divided into departments, each having active and obliging clerks to superintend them.

Now for Mr. [Clarence] Ashley’s and “the Golden Key”. Here there is but one department, but that department comprehends almost everything made of iron, or iron and wood, from the finest bradawls up to seven foot saws; from improved mouse traps to patent straw cutters. What may be found at Ashley’s would be as difficult to mention as what may not be found. Whatever is wanted, however, there is gas light enough to search for it.

But we are exhausted, and must break off for the present; next week we will resume our walk.

.Brockville ca1852 (an engraving taken from a drawing by Owen Staples)

The Town of Brockville in the early 1850s.

An engraving based on a drawing by Owen Staples.

2 February 1854:

Part two:

In noticing a few facts connected with the Gas House, we mentioned that Mr. [James] Perry, of Montreal, was the ruling spirit. We meant this in its widest sense. But for the exertions of’ this gentleman and his brother, Mr. A. Perry, of this town, as we stated on a former occasion, there would have been no gas in Brockville. We make this statement in justice to the two gentlemen named.

Last week we left off at Ashley’s. Since then we believe our local contemporary has supplied himself with an extra quantity of gas. We felt inclined to visit the establishment and chronicle the fact, but there was such a leak last Saturday, we were compelled to “make tracks” for the use of a smelling bottled from the establishment of “Ralph and Converse,” under the impression that some nasty, ugly, ill-tempered skunk had taken up its abode near the sanctum of our contemporary.

Ralph and Converse have their premises well lighted, the variegated lights reflecting beautifully on the stock of fancy perfumery, chemical compounds, medicines, etc., placed around their store. In fact this is the best lighted building in town, especially when the Reading Room and the Recorder Office lights are in full blast.

[Edward] Lawless, till he enters his new store still rejoices in lamp-light. We trust to have it in our power to blazon him forth as one of the “new lights” soon.

Friend [Alexander] Starr has done the thing handsomely. His premises, from top to bottom, are splendidly lighted. A well cooked plate of oysters could always be obtained at Mr. Starr’s establishment, but such things will now be swallowed with a double relish in his neat and comfortable back parlour, especially when the quality of fixings are taken into account.

We now introduce our readers to Mr. Thomas Smart. He too has made the most of his premises. Sleek furs and winter garments seem all the smoother when seen by gas-light. One would almost imagine that Smart had the produce of every quarter of the world to show, and they are well shown too. The very idea of being surrounded with so many articles for wear, is almost sufficient to induce a warm feeling towards Smart. May his light never be less.

Friedenheimer’s ;  ah, we must shade our eyes here. That bright light reflected on silver surfaces is really dazzling. Here rich articles for use and ornament are so nicely arranged, that but for the excellent light, it might be difficult to point out the prettiest. Gold and silver watches, rings, chains etc., are here in profusion, and all who know Friedenheimer know that in his hands, whether by daylight or gaslight, they are safe.

Willson’s Hotel is a prominent building in Brockville. From what is known of its spirited proprietor, it will at once be granted that he is not the man to allow a real improvement to escape his notice. Any person visiting the hotel will see at a glance, that gaslight has added much to the comfort of this now celebrated hotel. We might write a whole column in praise of [William H.] Willson‘s establishment, but we know flattery only pains the worthy proprietor, and we therefore leave him to enjoy the popularity he has so justly earned as a kind obliging host.

McKenzie‘s well kept hotel, is the last public place lighted with gas on the river side of the Main street. Mr. [John] McKenzie‘s quiet, kind and unassuming manners have earned for him many patrons. So far as gas-light is concerned, we know few things of so much benefit to a hotel. Mr. McKenzie seems to have been aware of this, and we have no doubt the improved light will add to the many comforts to be found within the friendly domicile of Mr. McKenzie.

Crossing the Main street from Mr. McKenzie’s a little westward, the next store fitted up with gas is that of Mr. Thomas Webster. This gentleman has also considerably enlarged his premises, which are now fitted up in a neat and convenient style. Dry goods, groceries, and hardware are piled around in well-filled compartments, attended to by two active and obliging assistants. The gas-light has improved Mr. Webster’s premises in a very great degree; indeed from the light thrown towards the street, that part of the town seems much more lively at night than it was formerly.

The City Block” cannot he passed unnoticed. Here the Messrs Parr have separate saddlery establishments, although that of Mr. Arthur Parr is the only one as yet furnished with gas. Under Mr. A. Parr’s store, as we mentioned a week or more ago, Mr. [Elihu] Spencer has opened a [daguerreotype] saloon, fitted up in city style. The saloon is also well lighted with gas.

Buss and McClear are the next progressive men we find on our list. These gentlemen have but lately “opened store” in Flint’s building, with a large stock of groceries, etc. and from their having introduced gas into their premises, it would appear they are determined not to hide themselves under a bushel.

Mr. Cole also holds out the inducement of “shaving made easy” by the light of gas. Mr. Cole’s attending to business is well known, and there is no probability that his attention will be less than heretofore.

Ah, friend, [Thomas] Camm, do not be afraid; though last, you are by no means least in the list of improvers. Some philosophers profess to mend other people’s morals, others profess to mend the manners of their fellow man; but it is thy duty, as it is thy business, to make some men, and to mend others (in shape we mean.) In this thy useful, and therefore honourable vocation, gas-light is an object not to be lightly esteemed. While, therefore, you improve others, we trust the new light” will lead you in the path of improving your own fortune.

This concludes our walk through Brockville by gas-light If any gas-consumers are omitted in the list, we will willingly notice them next week, if informed of the omission.

P.S. – Since the above was written, we understand that Mr. Dana has lighted his premises with gas. Leather and light will now go hand in hand.

Gas Works

A later photo of the old Gas Works on St. Paul St.

Aeronaut Prof. Squires Provides an Exciting Dominion Day in Brockville – 1874

Union Flag

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The history of Brockville has seldom known the activity and excitement of one day which was celebrated here in Brockvllle over a century ago. On that day, July 1, 1874, the town was filled to capacity with citizens and visitors who had come to celebrate the Confederation of our country. It was estimated by the local press that perhaps 10,000 people were on the streets of Brockvllle on that Dominion Day in 1874. The organizers of this event had done themselves proud.

Large numbers of persons had arrived from Clayton, Alexandria Bay, Gananoque, Cornwall, Morrisburg, Prescott, Watertown, Ogdensburg, Ottawa, and many of the principal villages and towns in between.

The day’s programme was full. The morning began on the river with a regatta of sailboat races. At 11 o’clock a thrilling parade of local tradesmen stated off along Buell, Pearl, Perth, and then back along King Street. Most of the local industries had mounted elaborate floats. Represented were James Smarts Novelty Works, Cossitt Bros. Implement Factory, Brockville Agricultural Works, Tilley & Briggs Sash Factory, T. Gilmour & Co., and Wood Bros. Cigar Factory, along with others. King St. by this time was so clogged with people the procession had difficulty moving.

Brockvllle was also hosting several companies of visiting volunteer firemen. Firemen from Ottawa, Prescott, and Almonte were here to add to the festivities. It was reported that the Mississippi Fire Company of Almonte arrived by excursion train from Ottawa along with 33 car loads of people. The firemen, along with local bands and dignitaries led off on a procession through town at one o’clock. In the afternoon, the Almonte firemen worked hard in competition to throw a stream of water 202 feet 7 inches, more than 28 feet farther than their closest competitors, the Chaudiere Company from Ottawa.

But it was later in the afternoon that the event which has made this day famous in Brockville history was scheduled to take place. An American by the name of Herman D. Squires, a practitioner of the art of balloon flight, had been invited by the Dominion Day organizers to attempt an ascension from the centre of Brockville in one of his balloons. A reporter from the Evening Recorder described the event with all the thrills of the moment:

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from the Evening Recorder
July 2, 1874

Typical Balloon of the period

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The Balloon Ascension

At five o’clock p.m., Professor Squires [ Herman D. Squires] of New York, the daring aeronaut attempted to ascend with his famous balloon, the “Atlantic”. The starting point was Court House Square. The professor regarded the situation particularly dangerous in a high wind, as the square is flanked on each side by lofty buildings, including the Court House, Bank of Montreal and Wesleyan Methodist Church.

During the afternoon the balloon, which was being inflated with hydrogen gas, was the centre of attraction, and at the time of starting, fully ten thousand people had assembled to witness the voyage in mid-air.

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Map of Court House Square (w label) 1861

Brockville’s Court House Square. The site of the balloon launch

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The Atlantic is constructed of a peculiar quality of muslin, very thin and soft in texture, but when oiled, capable of holding the gas. The netting which envelops the balloon is double and twisted silk, and the ropes by which the netting is attached to the basket are about 3/8 of an inch in diameter. The basket is constructed of strong wicker work, being about three feet in diameter and two feet in depth. The ropes by which it is attached to the balloon are woven in so as to pass completely in under the same.

During the day several small balloons were sent up to show the direction of the wind. From experiments thus made, it was shown that the principal danger was the Bank of Montreal and the W.M. Church. Previous to starting, it was determined to remove the balloon from the place where it was inflated to a point nearer the Court House, with the expectation that the Atlantic would pass to the north of the spire.

The cargo in the basket consisted of three bags of sand, weighing each about fifty pounds, a grappling iron, to which was attached a strong rope, and Professor Squires, who was to start upon his 187th voyage amid the clouds. All being in readiness orders were given to cast off; there was a hush and the multitude grew silent as the unwieldy Atlantic, being freed, swayed backwards and forward, and slowly rose from its resting place to make another voyage in the ethereal blue.

 

Typical Gentleman Aeronaut

We have no pictures of Herman D. Squires, but he may have resembled this “Gentleman Aeronaut”.

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A steady gale had been blowing all day, but its strength was not apparent until the balloon struck the current of air above the house tops. This reached, it swayed with the breeze, and swept on at a rate of at least fifteen miles an hour. Its course was directly for the steeple of the Wesleyan Methodist Church. The Professor at once perceived the danger, and could have avoided it by throwing out a bag of ballast, which would have given him sufficient buoyancy to have passed over the steeple. But, unfortunately, the square below was crowded with thousands of spectators, and a bag of sand thrown out would have crushed some person below. The sand was thrown out in small quantities, and the balloon swept upward and onward, but, unfortunately, not swerving from its dangerous direction, it became apparent that the balloon would strike the spire.

The watching, anxious, breathless multitude awaited the shock with compressed lips and blanched cheeks. With a tremendous rush the Atlantic struck the apex of the spire, and in another instant parted in twain. At the same moment, the basket containing the daring aeronaut crashed against the spire some twenty feet below. Seeing as it were instant death before him, Prof. Squires threw one hand forward to avert as far as possible the shock, at the same time allowing his body to sway in the opposite direction.

The crash of the collision resounded over the square, now silent as the grave. As the balloon collapsed and the gas escaped it was seen that the netting had caught on the point of the spire. A moment of breathless suspense. Squires was not seen to move a muscle; a whisper ran round; the collision has killed him. Then a slight movement, and the basket began to slip; it was evident that the netting was giving away. Women grew white with terror, brave men trembled. There, at a height of eighty feet above the earth, was a fellow being hanging by a few slender threads, above and around him, the glittering steeple sheeted with tin, below the cold stone battlements of the tower, on which to fall was instant death.

A pause, and the basket had evidently been arrested in its downward course. Squires was seen to grasp the netting. Hope rose, he might be saved.

The moment he struck the spire there was a rush for ladders and ropes. Without number were the plans suggested to save him from death. But at this moment, brave men were clambering up the inside of the grim church tower, determined to save a human life.

Wall Street Methodist Church 1875

The Wesleyan Methodist Church, where the balloon was caught on the spire.

This is now the greatly-enlarged Wall St. United Church.

A small window directly below the eaves of the tower opens directly beneath where the basket was suspended, but, unfortunately, it was very contracted, and it did not seem possible for a man by any means to squeeze through the aperture. But in a few seconds a man thrust his head through the window, and a board was pushed out of the lower portion of the opening, the end on the inside being held by men within. Then began a struggle. It was apparent that a man was endeavouring to crawl through the narrow hole out upon the board. The clothes were torn from his person in the attempt, but inch by inch he gained, and at last was seated on the board directly below the basket.

The situation was one of great danger. Should the netting give way, the basket in its descent would catch the daring man and hurl him, together with Squires, into eternity.

At his appearance there was a cheer that made the firmament ring again. The heroic man who thus risked his life to save a fellow-being in distress was Arthur Osment. It was seen when Osment stood up that he could not assist Squires from his perilous position.

The main body of the net work had caught on the northern side of the spire, only two or three small cords having passed around the other side, and these when the basket slipped became slack. The least motion on the part of Squires would have precipitated him upon the stone steps below.

Osment spoke to Squires, who requested him to place his shoulder under the basket. This being done, Squires caught hold of a slight oval projection on the spire, which offered a slight hold, and thus helped to support the basket. At this instant, Mr. Andrew Stevenson appeared at an opening in the spire above Squires. The opening consists of a small trap door and was not discovered for some time.

Another cheer went up, as Stevenson came out upon the spire, reached down a hand and firmly grasped the aeronaut, and slowly drew him up to a place of safety. The suspense was over and Squires was saved.

Stevenson displayed great presence of mind and courage, and deserves well the praise that was showered upon him. On Squires perceiving a person above him, he enquired, “Can you hold me?” Stevenson replied, “I can lift you if you weigh a ton.” Evidently the right man was in the right place.

We learn from Professor Squires that when thrown against the spire he was rendered insensible for a moment or two, but recovered his senses on hearing some person shout to him from the inside of the steeple. His injuries consist of concussion of his side and a bruised knee. The professor is without doubt a brave man and displayed coolness, firmness and judgment while in his perilous position. The accident was caused solely by the current of air which could not be ascertained from the ground, and no discredit reflects on Mr. Squires.

Through the exertions of Messrs. Osment, Stevenson, McDougall and Pyke, assisted by several others, the remains of the balloon were removed from the spire. A collection was taken up to defray in part the expense caused by the loss of the Atlantic. We understand about $75 was raised.

The professor departed for Troy this morning, where he is to ascend with another balloon on the 4th of July.

The day’s activities still went on in spite of this near tragedy. The regatta continued after supper time with numerous rowing events till almost darkness. Then a foot race through the downtown streets was witnessed by crowds of onlookers  A man named Loverin from Ottawa sprinted far ahead, and left his four competitors, far behind at the finish.

The day ended finally with a torch light procession, There were many who would be able to remember the events or that day for years afterward.

Group Photographs by A.C. McIntyre — 1866

26 December 1855 — from an advertisement placed in the Brockville Recorder.

A.C. McIntyre

Next door to Mr. Lothrop’s, Main Street.

Ambrotypes or Positive Pictures on Glass.

“They are not reversed”

This ad could be the earliest indication that Mr. Alexander C. McIntyre had come to Brockville to begin a very successful career in the pioneering field of photography. “Ambrotypes” were the next improvement in the field after “Daguerreotypes”..

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Five gents from Brockville

Five Gents from Brockville

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1866

31 January 1866 — from the Brockville newspaper, the British Central Canadian.

Previous to the adjournment of the County Council, and by invitation of Mr. McIntyre, the members in a body visited his gallery, and having formed in a group, had their photograph taken in first rate style.  We have seen the plates and the likenesses are extremely correct.

14 February 1866 — from the Brockville newspaper, the British Central Canadian.

PHOTOGRAPHS

Group photographs are now all the fashion, and our friend McIntyre is fully prepared to please the public.  His room is admirably fitted up for the purpose and he has lately imported from New York a beautiful architectural design for a background.  His group of the County and City Councils, and that of one of the classes of Victoria Common School are very generally admired.  Competent judges pronounce McIntyre’s photographs to be the best in the province.

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Brockville Town Council 1866

Brockville Town Council — 1866

Sitting, ( high up in background) – William Fitzsimmons, Mayor

Standing, middle row – (left to right)  James Carron, Councillor, West Ward; Charles Stevenson, Chief Police Constable; Thomas Price, Councillor, West Ward.

Sitting, front row – (left to right)  R. Walker Grant, Councillor, West Ward; James J. Henderson, Councillor, Centre Ward; David Row, Councilor, Centre Ward; George S. McClean, Clerk and Treasurer; Christopher Fletcher, Councillor, East Ward; Edmund J. Senkler, Jr., Councillor, East Ward; John Stagg, Jr., Councilor, East Ward.
MissingRobert Fitzsimmons, Councillor, Centre Ward.

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Studends & Teachers of Victoria Common School

Students, teachers and Principal of Victoria Common School — 1866

Boys and girls were taught in separate classes at this time. This is most likely just two of the classes in Victoria Common School on Wall St. They all dressed up for this group shot and walked down to McIntyre’s studio at the corner of Victoria Ave. and King St. In the centre is Mr. William Bigg (P), the principal. He shows up in two pictures here. My guess is that at least two of these young women are the teachers (T).

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Common School Board 1866Staff and Trustees of Common School Board — 1866

(standing, back row) Herbert S. McDonald; William R. Bigg, principal, Victoria School; Christopher Fletcher.
(sitting, front row) James J. Henderson; Robert Kinney, teacher, Victoria School; William McCullough, Chairman of the Board; Thomas Price.

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Non-Com Militia Officers - 1866

Brockville Rifle Co. – Militia Officers & Non-Comms – 1866

During the lead-up to the anticipated invasion of Canada by the American Fenian Brotherhood, troops and officers of the area Militia Companies were assembled and stationed in Brockville during 1866. These were the officers, corporals and sergeants of the Brockville Rifle Company.  The Rifles wore dark green uniforms.

Brockville & Ottawa Railway ………. 1860 Train Schedule

The following details were taken from a notice placed in the Brockville newspaper “The Monitor” on 23 June 1860.

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Brockville & Ottawa Railway Depot

The B&O RR locomotive “Renfrew” standing at the depot on the Brockville waterfront

BROCKVILLE  &  OTTAWA  RAILWAY

Change of Time

On or after Monday, May 5th, and until further notice, trains will run as follows: —

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MAIN LINE

Going South

Leave Almonte at     8:00 am

Leave Carleton Place at     8:30 am

Leave Franktown at     9:15 am

Leave Smith’s Falls at     9:50 am

Leave Irish Creek at     10:25 am

Leave Bellamy’s at     11:20 am

Arriving at Brockville at     12:00 noon

Going North

Leave Brockville at     4:00 pm

Leave Bellamy’s at     4:45 pm

Leave Irish Creek at      5:35 pm

Leave Smith’s Falls at     6:10 pm

Leave Franktown at     6:45 pm

Leave Carleton Place at     7:25 pm

Arrive at Almonte at     7:50 pm

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PERTH BRANCH

Going East

Leave Perth for Smith’s Falls     8:50 am

Leave Perth for Smith’s Falls     5:00 pm

Going West

Leave Smith’s Falls for Perth     10:00 am

Leave Smith’s Falls for Perth     6:05 pm

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Passengers for Montreal and Toronto take the (Grand Trunk Railway) express trains at Brockville, which cross each other at the station at 2:05 pm.

Passengers for Ottawa, taking the train leaving Brockville at 2:05 pm, will connect at Prescott with the Prescott & Ottawa Railway, reaching Ottawa the same evening.

Brockville GTR Depot

The gardens at the Grand Trunk Railway station in Brockville about 1855

A stage leaves Arnprior every morning, and returns in the evening, connecting with the train leaving and arriving at Almonte.  Passengers by this route, from and to the upper Ottawa (valley), reach Montreal and Toronto the same evening; being the only route by which this can be done.

Trains run by Montreal time, which is 8 1/2 minutes faster than Brockville time.

Brockville, May 1st, 1860

Robert Watson

Managing Director,

B. & O. R.R.

An early wood-burning locomotive 1870s

A typical wood-burning locomotive in the 1870s